Good news/bad news in the field of electronic communication

The bad new is – predictably – coming from legislators.  This time, in the UK.

They are introducing a bill which would force all internet service providers (ISPs) to monitor, log and store all electronic communication.  But more than just that:  they would also collect data about the physical electronic equipment used in the communication, who is communicating with whom and a long list of other intrusive measures.  And, yes – physical communication would be similarly monitored, copying addresses from envelopes and packages and keeping the info for the government’s reference…

But, don’t worry!  Home Office Secretary Theresa May said:

 “Unless you are a criminal, then you’ve nothing to worry about from this new law.”

Ooooooh, that makes me feel all warm and fuzzy…

OK, so the governments all over the world are using the fact that we are all distracted by the looming economic crisis (created by their corruption) to impose ever more intrusive surveillance on us.

And we should not worry, unless we are criminals!

Until, that is, the government decides that holding the views we hold makes us criminals…

Well, before we all get too depressed, let me get to the good news – predictably, from the world of science and technology.

While quantum cryptography has not quite delivered the desired level of security through encrypted communication that many of us had hoped it would, it seems that emerging technology based on the good old second law of thermodynamics just might give us a glimmer of hope!

‘Once again the secrecy is guaranteed by the laws of physics but instead of quantum mechanics, Kish and co say the second law of thermodynamics provides the necessary underwriting. That’s the same law that prohibits perpetual motion machines powered by heat from the environment.’

The goal of achieving securely encrypted communication is always to make sure the two parties communicating can decrypt the signal but anyone intercepting the message would lack the tools to decode it.  This newly announced method sounds great and secure.

Let’s hope it becomes generally used by ‘everyone’  before surveillance laws leave us frightened and silenced!

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